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Twelve Days of Christmas Tour


Weekend in Lyon, France with Amoureux de la Coree

Event date: 2013-11-01

Hello everyone,
I would like to invite you to our InKAS-sponsored annual event in France.
This year I am especially excited to meet people from other areas of France and Europe since our gathering will be held in Lyon, the city of gastronomy, as well as a place of historical importance and beautiful architecture.  It will be a wonderful location for our weekend's event.
Amoureux de la Corée and InKAS welcome you to this wonderful opportunity to be a part of our Korean cultural event.
A detail and updated program is attached to this invitation letter.
I am looking forward to meeting you all in Lyon.

 President of InKAS 

 Aieree Jung


InKAS Gohyang Program


2013 InKAS Korean Language Scholarships for Winter Semester

Event date: 2013-09-05

2013 InKAS Korean Language Scholarships for Winter Semester

InKAS provides Korean language scholarships to overseas Korean adoptees as an opportunity to learn the Korean language at a prestigious university in South Korea. In association with a grant from the Ministry for Health & Welfare and the participating universities, scholarship grantees can study at any of these language institutes: Ewha Womans, Korea, Kyunghee, Sangmyung, Seoul National, Sogang, Sookmyung Women’s and Yonsei University.

1. Required Documents and Terms

A. Documents

- One on-line application form (inkas.org)

- One photocopy of adoption document with your Korean name

- One photocopy of your passport with valid passport number

- One photocopy of your high school diploma or higher

- One photo (3x4cm)

B. Terms

- For students re-applying for a second semester, only an application form needs to be resubmitted, but some documents might be requested by InKAS or the university.

- If you have any problems or issues from previous semesters at the Korean language school, your application can be rejected or your acceptance may be cancelled by personal notification.

- An applicant must be at least 18 years old.

- Only fully-completed applications along with all the required documents will be accepted.

- Selections will be made entirely on a first-come first-served basis.

2. Application Deadline

- For Seoul National University: 24:00, September 22th (Korean time)

- For all other universities: 24:00, September 29th (Korean time)

3. How to apply

- Sign up or log into InKAS website ▷ Log in ▷ Our service ▷ Scholarship ▷ click on ‘Apply for scholarship’

- Fill out application form for 2013 Winter Scholarship ▷ Submit the completed form with all proper required documents

4. University information for language scholarships available through InKAS

University

Website

Course period

Course available through InKAS

Ewha Uni.

http://elc.ewha.ac.kr/korean/en/template/intensive01.asp

2013.12.11

-

2014.02.26

Intensive Program

Korea Uni.

http://klcc.korea.ac.kr/korea.koreaIntro.action?strIntroMode=001

2013.12.02

 – 

2014.02.14

Regular Program

Kyunghee Uni.

http://kor.iie.ac.kr/contents/bbs/bbs_content.html?bbs_cls_cd=006001001

2013.12.18

-

2014.02.27

Regular Course

Sangmyung Uni.

http://cklc.smu.ac.kr/KLC/process_e.php

2013.12.16

-

2014.02.25

Regular

Program

Seoul National Uni.

http://lei.snu.ac.kr/klec/

2013.12.02

-

2014.02.07

Regular Program

Sogang Uni.

https://klec.sogang.ac.kr/

2013.12.02

-

2014.02.19

Regular Course

(20hrs/wk)

Sookmyung Uni.

http://www.lingua-express.com/main.jsp?idx=070101

2013.12.09

-

2014.02.20

Regular Morning

Yonsei Uni.

http://www.yskli.com/prog_regular.htm

2014.01.09

-

2014.03.21

Regular Morning

* Classes run from 9a.m to 1p.m Monday through Friday

* The university information above can be changeable by university’s decision

* We do not offer scholarships for alternative language programs (evening or shorter-hour classes)

5. Fee

- InKAS Application fee: 82,000KW (77.00 USD) : It's non-refundable. Please don't pay before receiving an official scholarship award e-mail.

- University registration fee: Different terms apply for each university.

- Tuition fee: 50% covered for 6 of the universities.

Only 30% covered for Yonsei University.

* Any previous scholarship cancellations can have a negative impact on your ability to receive another scholarship for 2013 winter semester. 

* Please check the university websites for winter semester schedule once again.

* If you are a recipient of a scholarship for the 2013 winter semester, you will receive payment instructions and more information about this course by email.

For further inquiries regarding InKAS Korean Language Scholarships, please email or contact InKAS.

contact@inkas.org

02-3148-0258


InKAS Chuseok Party

Event date: 2013-09-15

Invite all Korean oversea adoptees to InKAS Chuseok Party


Office will be closed - August 23th

Event date: 2013-08-22

The InKAS office will be closed Friday, August 23th for supporting BNS meeting. We will be open for regular office hours on Monday


Hagwon

Event date: 2013-08-21

Hagwon (Korean: 학원) (also hagweon or hakwon) is the Korean-language word for a for-profit private institute, academy or cram school prevalent in South Korea. Although most widely known for their role as "cram schools", where children can study to improve scores, hagwons actually perform several educational functions: they provide supplementary education that many children need just to keep up with the regular school curriculum, remedial education for the children who fall behind in their work, training in areas not covered in schools, and preparation for students striving to improve test scores and preparing for the high school and university entrance examinations (the university entrance exam is also called suneung). Many other children, particularly younger children, attend nonacademic hagwon for piano lessons, art instruction, swimming, and taekwondo. Most of the young children have been to a hagwon for piano or art lessons at least once. Hagwon also play a social role, and many children, especially the younger ones, say they like going to hagwon because they are able to make new friends; many children ask to be sent because their friends attend. There are many hagwons for adults too, such as flower arrangement and driving-license hagwons.The term is also sometimes used to describe similar institutions operated by Korean Americans in the United States.

Children of all ages often attend hagwons, even those in the pre-school age bracket. It is not uncommon for students to be enrolled in several hagwon of different subject areas at once in addition to their normal school attendance. Hagwons often specialize in subjects like mathematics, foreign languages, science, arts, or music. Many hagwons also have adults as students, particularly those dedicated to teaching the English language.

While some see hagwons as filling a need not being adequately met by the public school system, others see them as creating an unequal footing between the poor and rich in Korea.

In 2008 it was reported that there were over 70,000 hagwons in South Korea with 47 percent of them focused on high school enrollment.

Impact on real estate

A higher than average concentration of hagwons in the Gangnam-gu area, specifically Daechi-dong, has been cited as the primary reason for an increase in real estate costs in the area. In the 1970s the Seoul government made some top schools relocate to the area; however, the schools there have become associated with entry into elite high schools and then elite universities. Many residents feel their children need to be associated with these schools in order to reach the upper levels of business and success. As more parents try to move to the area to allow their children to attend these schools,the prices of real estate in the area have risen to 300 percent of similar areas in Seoul. In 2003 the government had planned to develop a hagwon center in Pangyo to relieve some of the pressure on Gangnam, yet after heavy criticism for only shifting the problem around and not solving it, the government canceled the plan only a couple weeks later.


Korean shamanism

Event date: 2013-08-21

Korean shamanism, today known as Muism (Mugyo, "religion of the Mu") or sometimes Sinism (Shingyo, "religion of the gods", with shin being the Korean character derivative of the Hanja),[3] encompasses a variety of indigenous religious beliefs and practices of the Korean people and the Korean sphere. In contemporary South Korea, the most used term is Muism and a shaman is known as a mudang (무당, 巫堂) or Tangol (당골). The role of the mudang, usually a woman, is to act as intermediary between a spirit entity, spirits or gods and human beings.

Women are enlisted by those who want the help of the spirit world. Shamans hold gut, or services, in order to gain good fortune for clients, cure illnesses by exorcising negative or 'bad' spirits that cling to people, or propitiate local or village gods. Such services are also held to guide the spirit of a deceased person to higher realms.

The government has discouraged belief in shamanism as superstition and for many years minimized its persistence in Korean life. Yet in a climate of growing nationalism and cultural self-confidence, the dances, songs, and incantations that compose the gut have come to be recognized as an important aspect of Korean culture.

Beginning in the 1970s, rituals that formerly had been kept out of foreign view began to resurface, and occasionally even the manager of a Western-style hotel or other executive could even be seen attending a shamanic exorcism in the course of opening a new branch in Seoul. Some of these aspects of gut have been designated valuable cultural properties that need to be preserved and passed on to future generations.

The future of shamanism itself was uncertain in the late 1980s. However, observers believed that many of shamanism's applications would probably be performed by the psychiatric profession as the government expands mental health treatment facilities in the future.

Mudang

Mudang can be categorized into two basic archetypes: sessǔmu, who inherit the right to perform the shamanic rituals and kangshinmu, who are initiated into their mudang status through a ceremony. Sessŭmu historically lived in the southern part of the Korean peninsula, while kangshimu were found throughout the peninsula and contiguous areas inhabited by Koreans, but were mostly concentrated in the north (modern day North Korea) and the contiguous areas of China and the central part of the peninsula around the Han River.

Shinbyeong (spirit sickness)

The central feature of a shaman's initiation is her affliction with an illness known as a shinbyeong. This is also called the "spirit sickness" or "self-loss" and characterized by a loss of appetite, insomnia, visual and auditory hallucinations. A ritual called a naerim-gut cures this illness, which also serves to induct the new shaman.

Rituals or gut (굿)

The gut is a shamanic ritual during which the shaman offers a sacrifice to the spirits. Through singing and dancing the shaman begs the spirits to intervene in the fortunes of the humans in question. The shaman wears a very colourful costume and normally speaks in trance. During a gut a shaman changes his or her costume several times.

There are three elements of a gut. Firstly, there are the spirits as the object of folk beliefs. Secondly, there are the believers who pray to those spirits. Finally, there is the shaman mediating between the two.

The actual form of gut varies between regions. The unfolding and style of the shamanic rite depends largely on the objective of the ceremony. The individual character and abilities of the shaman bring a unique character to the respective ritual to be performed.


Ondol

Event date: 2013-08-21

An ondol, also called gudeul, in Korean traditional architecture, is underfloor heating which uses direct heat transfer from wood smoke to the underside of a thick masonry floor. In modern usage it refers to any type of underfloor heating, or a hotel or sleeping room in Korean (as opposed to Western) style.

The main components of the traditional ondol are a firebox or stove (agungi; 아궁이) accessible from an adjoining (typically kitchen or master bedroom) room, a raised masonry floor underlain by horizontal smoke passages, and a vertical, freestanding chimney on the opposite exterior providing a draft. The heated floor is supported by stone piers or baffles to distribute the smoke, covered by stone slabs, clay and an impervious layer such as oiled paper.

This Korean architectural element is similar to the kang bed-stove found in nearby modern-day Northeast China, historically known as Manchuria, which is used in and constructed similarly to the ondol.

Ondol had traditionally been used with a living space for sitting, eating, sleeping and pastimes, in most Korean homes before the 1960s. The furnace burned mainly rice paddy straws, agricultural crop waste, biomass or any kind of dried firewood. For short-term cooking, rice paddy straws or crop waste was preferred, while long hours of cooking and floor heating needed longer-burning firewood. Unlike modern-day water heaters, the fuel burning was either sporadically or regularly done (two to five times a day), dependent on frequency of cooking and seasonal weather conditions.

With the traditional ondol heating, floor spots closer to the furnace were normally warm enough with warmer spots reserved for elders and honored guests. Ondol had problems such as carbon monoxide poisoning resulting from burning coal briquette, and environmental pollution. For these reasons, other technology heats modern Korean homes.


Hanok

Event date: 2013-08-21

Hanok is a term to describe Korean traditional houses. Korean architecture lends consideration to the positioning of the house in relation to its surroundings, with thought given to the land and seasons.

The interior structure of the house is also planned accordingly. This principle is also called Baesanimsu (배산임수), literally meaning that the ideal house is built with a mountain in the back and a river in the front, with the ondol heated rock system for heating during cold winters and a wide daecheong (대청) front porch for keeping the house cool during hot summers.

Houses differ according to region. In the cold northern regions of Korea, houses are built in a closed square form to retain heat better. In the central regions, houses are 'L' shaped. Houses in the southernmost regions of Korea are built in an open 'I' form. Houses can also be classified according to class and social status.

Characteristics

The environment-friendly aspects of traditional Korean houses range from the structure's inner layout to the building materials which were used. Another unique feature of traditional houses is their special design for cooling the interior in summer and heating the interior in winter.

Since Korea has hot summers and cold winters, the 'Ondol (Gudeul),' a floor-based heating system, and 'Daecheong,' a cool wooden-floor style hall were devised long ago to help Koreans survive the frigid winters and to block sunlight during summer. These primitive types of heating and air-conditioning were so effective that they are still in use in many homes today¹). The posts, or 'Daedulbo' are not inserted into the ground, but are fitted into the cornerstones to keep Hanok safe from earthquakes.

Materials

The raw materials used in Hanok, such as soil, timber, and rock, are all natural and recyclable and do not cause pollution. Hanok's have their own tiled roofs (Giwa), wooden beams and stone-block construction. Cheoma is the edge of Hanok's curvy roofs. The lengths of the Cheoma can be adjusted to control the amount of sunlight that enters the house. Hanji (Korean traditional paper) is lubricated with bean oil making it waterproof and polished. Windows and doors made with Hanji are beautiful and breathable.

Regional differences

The shapes of Hanok differ regionally. Due to the warmer weather in the southern region, Koreans built Hanok in a straight line like the number 1. In order to allow good wind circulation, there are open wooden floored living area and many windows. The shape of the most popular Hanok in the central region is like letter "L" or Korean letter "ㄱ", an architectural mixture of the shapes in the northern and the southern regions. Hanoks in the cold northern region, are box-shaped like Korean letter "ㅁ" so that it would be able to block the wind flow in building Hanoks. They do not have an open wooden floored area but the rooms are all joined together.

Differences according to social class

The structure of Hanok is also classified according to social class. Typical yangban (upper class) houses with giwa (tiled roof) emphasized not only the function of the house, but also possess great artistic value. On the other hand, the houses of the commoners (as well as some impoverished yangban) with choga (a roof plaited by rice straw) were built in a more strictly functional manner.


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InKAS - International Korean Adoptee Service Inc
contact@inkas.org | Phone: +82-2-3148-0258 | Fax: +82-2-3148-0259
(03698) 213ho, 153-3 Pyeongchang-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul